Community Resources: Entrepreneurship Course at RCC

Last week, I completed the Create Your Own Job Seminar. Offered at Roxbury Community College, the course introduces topics from crafting a business plan to deciding when and how to incorporate your business. The course culminated with a one on one 15 minute, pro bono Q&A with one of the lawyers of Latham & Watkins, LLP.

I really appreciated Alexa and Priya of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice for their availability and willingness as mentors. They wanted to know our individual goals and presented topics to us with this in mind. Each week a different guest speaker presented on topics such as personal finances, business planning, and marketing. It definitely benefited us that the speaker each week was different and a specialist in their field. Not only were we hearing from a specialist, but we were hearing different perspectives, which helped to reinforce what I was learning.

Travis Grillo of Grillo’s Pickles, came to speak as an example of the program’s success. His business, self described as “starting with a pickle and a dream“, started with a niche product that grew over time because of demand, rather than the planned profit potential of a typical startup. One of the more laid back presentations, we brainstormed out loud ways in which the markets of the class participants overlap and how, just with the ideas in the room, we can help each other.

That is not to say that a person should not take the course if they have not yet determined what their product or niche market is. I attended the course as a musician looking for the skills to create opportunities for myself. I literally wrote that on my attendance intake form the first day. It so happens that, during the stretch of the course, some ideas formulated for me, but the knowledge I gained in the class was useful all the same.

Anyone who knows me has heard me lament about the lack of business training that artists receive from higher educational institutions. Did you know that when the CIA runs security clearances for job applicants, they check your credit history? Nowhere in Quantum of Solace does M remind 007 that he should be keeping his receipts. If spies have to find time between learning advanced driving skills, espionage, languages, and marksmanship to be financially responsible, why shouldn’t we? (Granted, rubbing elbows with the 1 percent, while impeccably dressed and digging for information, you would probably hear some insider information drop, but you see where I’m going with this.)

Artists operate in a nebulous area between non-profit and for profit. We are typically funded by grants, fellowships, and donations, but these projects also pay our salaries. This was not lost on the presenters when I asked specific pointed questions for my use case. I also appreciated that if the presenters did not know the answer, they would try to point me in the direction of a resource where I could find the answer for myself. I would highly recommend this class to anyone who wants take the helm of their own creative destiny and is looking for a place to start.

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The Evolving Worth of a Music Degree

education

education (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

The Royal School of Music recently explored the value of a music degree through round table discussion. Topics included the cultural impacts and economic obstacles that surround the pursuit of a music degree. Now, I appreciated this article for a few reasons:

1) “The qualities one would aspire for in a work-force suitable to meet the challenges of today’s economy are all those found in a music graduate,” noted one commentator. “We need to disband this myth that musicians are self-perpetuating and just create more musicians,” added another – top city firms, accountancy organisations and computing companies as among those who favour music graduates as potential employees.

Woot woot. IT Professional by day, teacher and musician by night right here.

While it is a myth that musicians are self-perpetuating, I never understood why that myth exists. In cases where musicians have children who also become musicians, I don’t understand why its a bad thing. It was the same as someone saying “I come from a family of lawyers” or “I went into the family business”. My mother is a musician, and a teacher. My father was an IT Manager. I don’t see how self perpetuation is something to avoid in that they successfully passed along their occupational knowledge to me. I also like Sushi, Oysters, am becoming an avid and opinonated gamer, interests I cannot attribute to my parents. They believe raw food is gross and could care less about video games. Although we grew up a Toyota family, my first car was a Chevy. I made these choices. I don’t know if it’s a myth so much as its a stereotype. Like most steroypes, they’re wrong.

2) “Despite general consensus as to the inherent cultural-economic value of musical study, there was considerable discontent around the table about its accessibility. One speaker commented on the decreasing number of music students at top institutions coming from backgrounds other than “music specialist schools, private schools and a few enlightened ‘LEAs’.”

As mentioned in a previous post, becoming a successful musician, including even acceptance to a reputable school, increasingly requires resources not available to most.

What was also interesting, was the mentioning of music and its cultural value (to the UK):

3) “One speaker argued that the relationship between music education and cultural value was not necessarily a direct one. “Many of those who add cultural value to the country do so because there is value here already. Our cultural value is increased by a critical mass coming from all over the world that wants to be part of our scene. The role musical education plays in cultural value, or to put it crudely, what we are yielding in terms of the economy, is probably diminishing rather than increasing.”

This comment was contested by another member of the panel, who cited the increasing numbers of foreign students studying music at UK institutions, and anecdotal evidence from those who claimed that paying more to study in the UK was worth it for the extra value they gained from being educated there. Another pointed to the legally binding commitments made by the government to promote musical participation in 2011-12 and, more recently, the National Plan for Music.”

I would have loved to know exactly why the speakers believe the cultural value of music education is dimishing rather than increasing. Is it because orchestras are struggling? Funding for arts education programs are also diminishing? Are students staying the UK after they graduate? Sometimes beauracracy can be a roadblock just as much economics. In the US, international students must apply for an H1B visa after they graduate to stay in the country. It must be sponsored by the employer and tied to your degree’s field of study.

Ultimately, the conclusions with which they ended were those that could be acted upon and not abstract, which is promising:

“We need to reconnect music with the world of ideas… We can rein people into music through linking the ideas, science, film and literature that surround the context of musical creation. We must not regress into isolation, but rather communicate the obvious value of music.”

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